The Wikipedia Effect

I just tried contributing to Wikipedia, the wonderful free-for-all online encyclopedia that, despite being written by the likes of you and I, is actually factually accurate and increasingly comprehensive.

(I like to think) I am articulate and well-informed individual so I thought it would be easy to share my accumulated mind-vomit and extend our collective wisdom. I never really intended to but then I came accross their article on Jean Piaget, only to discover it was woefully brief.

I thought that even I would be able to improve on it, but when i sat there trying to find a few choice words to set before the world, I found I was somewhat tongue-tied. It’s different here because no-one reads it and even if they did, they would quickly realise I’m unreliable!

Now if this had been an exam, it would have been a different story, with the adrenaline flowing and a deadline looming I’d have scrawled a screeds worth. In the end I was content to add the bit about Albino Swallows and a list of his professorial posts.

Very small first steps. My next two contributions were not much better. But maybe I’ve found my niche, you may notice a theme!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yule_Nielsen_Effect
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Line_Effect

Watch this space.

About caspar

Caspar is just one monkey among billions. Battering his keyboard without expectations even of peanuts, let alone of aping the Immortal Bard. By day he is an infantologist at Birkbeck Babylab, by night he runs BabyLaughter.net
This entry was posted in good. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to The Wikipedia Effect

Leave a Reply